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March 6th, 2004


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11:48 am - Good Day Sunshine
This time I remembered that there was no 8:30am agility today. I was still up and active by then, my body hates me. Yesterday I was up at 6:30. Similar the day before. I haven't been to bed before 2am, generally later. But I feel good.

A hell week is over.

So I have been enjoying a lovely, guilt-free morning. Gave the dog a massage, and have curled up the 2003 Berkshire Hathaway Annual Report, released this morning just for me. It is lovely, and I recommend reading it for those business-curious.


Some highlights (but not the reason to read it): they didn't make all that they could have, and still increased book value over $13B. They will pay $3.3B in taxes -- 2.5% of total income taxes paid by all US corporations -- for 2003. (BRK market valuation at 1%). ("Indeed, if only 540 taxpayers paid the amount
Berkshire will pay, no other individual or corporation would have to pay anything to Uncle Sam. That’s
right: 290 million Americans and all other businesses would not have to pay a dime in income, social
security, excise or estate taxes to the federal government.") They are one of the few companies that actually pays anywhere near the 30% corporate tax rate.

And some funny numbers, to go to a different news transition factoid I want to keep on livejournal:
Our federal tax return for 2002 (2003 is not finalized), when we paid $1.75 billion, covered a mere 8,905 pages. As is required, we dutifully filed two copies of this return, creating a pile of paper seven feet tall. At World Headquarters, our small band of 15.8, though exhausted, momentarily flushed with pride:
Berkshire, we felt, was surely pulling its share of our country’s fiscal load.

That sounds like a lot. I presume doing my taxes won't be that resource intensive. That's a lot of paper... until we consider our good friends SCO and IBM. In one of the latest rulings, IBM will have to deliver to SCO most of the historic code of AIX and Dynix ("about 232 products").
If you look, Your Honor, at what we are willing to produce, it is a substantial amount of code. We either have produced or will produce three million pages of paper of source code. That isn't every conceivable iteration of these products. It is, however, about 232 products.

If I may approach?

THE COURT: Certainly.

MR. MARRIOTT: Now, again, I think the production of this material is entirely uncalled for, Judge, but we are prepared to do it to put to rest this notion that somehow IBM is somehow hiding the ball with respect to the production of source code. This amounts to well over 100 million lines of source code and we are prepared to produce that. We said we were prepared to produce that in our opposition papers. This is the releases of AIX and Dynix and the released products during the relevant time periods that they are concerned about.

What we are not willing to do, Your Honor, is to produce every conceivable draft and iteration and version of this stuff that might exist in the files of the company that has more than 100,000 employees, with respect to products that were developed over decades, and as to which 8,000 different individuals worked on.

To state it, Your Honor, is to express its absurdity.

And so on. SCO early on decided that printed paper was the way to deliver code, and so IBM has to follow suit. Did they think about that? Do they forget the lumber companies IBM supported in its AntiTrust case?
How many semi-truck loads?
Authored by: Anonymous on Wednesday, March 03 2004 @ 11:00 PM EST
well, based on my experience:

3,000,000 pages / 5,000 sheets per standard carton = 600 cartons / 40 cartons
per pallet = 15 pallets.

Weight? Well, a standard carton weighs ~ 50 pounds * 600 = ta da! 30,000 pounds
(plus packaging of course)

That's (not quite) one truck load (tractor, and 48 or 53 ft. semi-trailer).
(Most over the road trucks are maxed with about 44,000 lbs of cargo.)

Did I mention that I've worked in the printing industry, and as a truck driver?

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